Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

songmaster wrote:

Some sockets may have a switch built into them, so circuitry can be designed to behave differently when there is something plugged into them (e.g. mute/disconnect the loudspeaker when the user plugs in a set of headphones). I don't know whether that's the case with the Chumby socket which uses a different kind of plug than a headphone jack, but it's a fairly likely explanation for the extra terminals on the socket.

I suppose that would make sense - from what I've read, it seems to be used for insertion detection, I guess so that the device knows whether or not it's charging. Now to find where the wires go on the Chumby itself...

Breaking everything, one screw at a time.

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

I think in the original jack on the device, two of the pads were basically structural to bind the jack to the board (but grounded), and the other two were electrical (ground and +5v).

You see that a lot with connectors and switches.

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

Duane wrote:

I think in the original jack on the device, two of the pads were basically structural to bind the jack to the board (but grounded), and the other two were electrical (ground and +5v).

You see that a lot with connectors and switches.

Boy, I sure hope that's the case; I accidentally ripped a solder pad off while desoldering the original jack. It seemed to click back in, however.
I also dropped the motherboard, with no protection, onto the floor from about two feet above the ground. Coincidentally, this isn't the first time this happened: it also happened with my DSi's motherboard.
The DSi didn't make it. I hope this isn't the case with the Chumby (everything looks fine to me).
Do you know where the GND and +5V pads were on the motherboard? So that I know which pads to solder to, once I get the wires.

Breaking everything, one screw at a time.

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

Took a quick look at the gerber files....

If you hold up the board so that the power connector is in the upper left corner, with the headphone jack to the right, it looks like the +5VDC is the contact in the lower right of the connector.  It's the one closest to the word "in" on the silkscreen, and it looks like there's a hole next to it. The other three contacts all appear to connect to GND.

You can get the schematic and gerber files on this wiki page:

http://wiki.chumby.com/index.php?title= … for_chumby

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

Duane wrote:

Took a quick look at the gerber files....

If you hold up the board so that the power connector is in the upper left corner, with the headphone jack to the right, it looks like the +5VDC is the contact in the lower right of the connector.  It's the one closest to the word "in" on the silkscreen, and it looks like there's a hole next to it. The other three contacts all appear to connect to GND.

You can get the schematic and gerber files on this wiki page:

http://wiki.chumby.com/index.php?title= … for_chumby

Thanks! I've never used a gerber file before (I'm used to looking at pictures with dots and lines denoting the solder points), so I guess I have something to learn. smile
If my Chumby managed to survive it's previous fall - I'll once more have a near-fully functional Chumby! I'll probably break it again in the first few minutes, though. tongue
Would only soldering to one of the GND points work? Or do all three have to be soldered? The two solder points I lifted were two GNDs (luckily not the +5V), and it would be a pain to splice the cable in three.

Breaking everything, one screw at a time.

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

All of the GNDs on the board are ultimately connected together, so you should have hundreds of choices of where to connect it.

There are several online gerber file viewers that you can use to see these files graphically.

This board looks like it has copper pours for both GND and +5 so you can't just count on the treating all of the large areas as GND, which is more typical.

32 (edited by kittensauce 2017-01-11 17:48:10)

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

Duane wrote:

All of the GNDs on the board are ultimately connected together, so you should have hundreds of choices of where to connect it.

There are several online gerber file viewers that you can use to see these files graphically.

This board looks like it has copper pours for both GND and +5 so you can't just count on the treating all of the large areas as GND, which is more typical.

Well, that would've been good to know. Guess I took the old power jack out for nothing, as I could have just soldered in some other place.
To put salt on the injury, the new jack doesn't even fit with the motherboard, as it's too vertically large. Guess it's back to the filers with me.

EDIT: The jack fits now, but there's a little hole underneath it. Maybe the Chumby will be cooled off now...?
EDIT2: Having trouble soldering to the original ground point; going to try a bigger solder tip. If that doesn't work, then I'll try the more easily accessible solder points with the helpful labels (which I probably should've used first).

Breaking everything, one screw at a time.

33 (edited by kittensauce 2017-01-11 18:57:59)

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

Oh man... I think this is the worst solder job I've ever seen. I doubt it'll even work. It looks like the board was burnt, probably from all the excess flux I thought would "help" (it didn't, really). I guess I can't lose much else, so there's no harm in trying.

Oh, where did I go wrong...?
http://i.imgur.com/hC5usnqh.jpg

Well, in any case, I forgot where I put the screws. Luckily, they were in a bag, so they shouldn't be too hard to find... I'll report back on whether or not my poor Chumby works when I'm not about to faint from fatigue.

Breaking everything, one screw at a time.

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

Yeah, that's pretty nasty.  Hopefully it works anyway smile

This type of soldering on large pads can get tricky because the copper sucks away the heat.

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

Duane wrote:

Yeah, that's pretty nasty.  Hopefully it works anyway smile

This type of soldering on large pads can get tricky because the copper sucks away the heat.

Well, then, soldering a modchip into my PSX suddenly sounds a lot less appealing. hmm
I've tidied up the solder a bit, so it should work better now. That is, if it didn't work already (I doubt it did). I should have the six-year-old (already?) alarm clock fixed soon. If it isn't fixed, then I guess I'll have a six-year-old brick! tongue

Breaking everything, one screw at a time.

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

It doesn't work sad
Even with just the display, the motherboard, and the power jack, it won't power on. It might be the power supply being bad, or something, but I doubt it.
It took me four months to break a clock. Is that a world record?

Breaking everything, one screw at a time.

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

Hmmm, well you can send it to me, and I can try to diagnose/fix it, or I can find you a replacement motherboard.

38 (edited by kittensauce 2017-01-13 14:27:48)

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

Duane wrote:

Hmmm, well you can send it to me, and I can try to diagnose/fix it, or I can find you a replacement motherboard.

Oh, thank you! I suppose I'll send it in, and if it doesn't work, I'll order a replacement motherboard. I guess we should discuss the details (cost, etcetera) over a more private messaging service (e-mail). I see that there's a "Send forum email" button, shall I use that? Thanks again!

Breaking everything, one screw at a time.

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

You can reach me through support@chumby.com

Re: Replacing the Chumby One screen?

Hi...i am a new user here. I faced the same issues. So as per my experience jiggling the power supply itself, then it is power supply.If  jiggling the barrel connector in the back of the device, it's more likely some damage to the connector, probably torn away from the circuit board.